Beyond Bubble Baths: What Self-Care Means When You're Chronically Ill | The Health Sessions

Beyond Bubble Baths: What Self-Care Means When You’re Chronically Ill

It’s the buzz word of the year: self-care.

You’ve probably seen the articles about why self-care isn’t selfish and the lists of activities you can do to look after yourself. The stories invoke images of massages and spa days, sipping vibrant veggie juices in trendy yoga outfits and snugging up with a blanket and a book in front of the fireplace.

But when you’re energy and mobility are limited, self-care becomes a lot less glamorous than the picture painted in magazines and lifestyle blogs. Chronic illness can turn even the most basic forms of self-care, like taking a shower and cooking a meal, into a challenge.

At the same time, our health care systems put a growing emphasis on individuals taking control over their own health and actively managing their illness. We’re expected to eat healthily, exercise, get enough sleep and think positively, or seek professional help whenever we can’t.

Of course that’s a good thing. It’s your body and your life, and ultimately you’re the one who has to take action to make the most of whatever situation you’re given. But how can you do that when you feel sick, exhausted and in pain?

Let’s look into what it really means to practice self-care with chronic illness. 

Read more >Beyond Bubble Baths: What Self-Care Means When You’re Chronically Ill



How to Learn to Accept Your Chronic Illness | The Health Sessions

How to Learn to Accept Your Chronic Illness

A year ago I wrote a blog post about why acceptance is not the same as giving up. Facing today’s reality doesn’t mean you give up hope for tomorrow. It just means you make the best of the given situation in this moment, instead of trying to change something that cannot be changed right now.

But the question remains: how do you start accepting that you’re chronically ill and may never get fully better again? How do you wrap your mind around the fact that your body, your life, your future are forever changed?

It’s a cliche, but acceptance takes time. It’s a gradual process that has its ups and downs. Emotions may stir up (again) when you enter a new phase in life or a new stage of your illness.

In his bestselling book, The Seven Spiritual Laws of Success, Deepak Chopra writes:

‘Acceptance simply means that you make a commitment: “Today I will accept people, situations, circumstances, and events as they occur.” (…) You can wish for things in the future to be different, but in this moment you have to accept things as they are.(…) Having accepted this circumstance, this event, this problem, responsibility then means the ability to have a creative response to the situation as it is now.’

Accepting chronic illness goes hand in hand with coping; learning how to deal with negative thoughts and feelings. It’s also about partly letting go of the person you thought you were and the life you had envisioned, and make the best of the new reality you’re handed.

How do you do that? I don’t have all the answers, but here are some psychological strategies to help you.

Read more >How to Learn to Accept Your Chronic Illness



Tried & Tested: How Aniko Jori-Molnar Created Her Own Action Plan for Recovery | The Health Sessions

Tried & Tested: How Aniko Created Her Own Action Plan for Recovery

This guest post is written by The Health Sessions reader Aniko Jori-Molnar, who shares her experiences with testing the strategies from ‘How to Create Your Own Action Plan for Recovery‘.

 

Why do I need to recover?

An important part of my identity is a fearless warrior that can handle (or can look like one who handles) everything in life. Good and bad. So I’m letting you in on a huge secret right now: I’ve been struggling with a chronic illness for nine years, and I’ve been struggling to accept this struggle.

I have EGPA (Churg-Strauss Syndrome), a rare auto-immune disease that attacks first and foremost the lungs, causing intense asthma symptoms, but then gradually causes all kinds of other problems in the body.

Of the many medication options, I’ve tried a few, and they’ve worked just fine, until now. With a recent heart involvement, the medical team decided to proceed to a chemo kind of drug for a more effective treatment. I feared the treatment as well as the signs of degrading health state I am in.

 

Why I choose to read a book about recovery

I could only think it is another milestone down the unlucky road. I was back to the old, pessimistic mental state. I was still not over the fact I’m sick forever. And I still wanted my old life back, and I would go as far as to throw a tantrum over it like a child.

I also knew this was not OK and I needed somebody (or something) to have my back when reality strikes. I needed to change the perspective.

Read more >Tried & Tested: How Aniko Created Her Own Action Plan for Recovery



15 Powerful Quotes to Inspire Resilience | The Health Sessions

15 Powerful Quotes to Inspire Resilience

“Life is not about how fast you run, or how high you climb, but how well you bounce.”

 

It’s one of the most vital skills in life, one that can be learned but not taught: resilience.

Resilience means adapting well to stressful situations and life-changing events, like losing your job, getting divorced or the death of a loved one.

Being able to bounce back from adversity becomes especially important when you’re living with chronic illness. Not only do you have to cope with painful symptoms and emotional stress, but there are also many obstacles to overcome every day. One of the biggest challenges of being chronically ill is learning how to deal with the constant ups and downs.

Many helpful articles have been written about how you can boost your resilience. But even the toughest cookies need a little motivation every now and then. Have a look at these 15 powerful quotes to inspire your resilience when life gets hard. 

Read more >15 Powerful Quotes to Inspire Resilience



How to Flip-Think Your 'Spoonie Guilt' with These Two Words| The Health Sessions

How to Flip-Think Your ‘Spoonie Guilt’ with These Two Words

When you live with limitations, you’ll inevitably disappoint yourself or others because you can’t live up to (your own) expectations.

Canceling a meeting at the last minute due to a crippling flare-up, not being able to do your ‘fair share’ around the house or having to say ‘no’ to your kids when they want to play with you, the list of things people with chronic illness can feel guilty about is long and diverse.

And even though it’s not your fault you can’t do things because you’re too sick, that doesn’t mean you don’t beat yourself up over letting people down.

But instead of apologizing all the time, there’s a way to express your ‘spoonie guilt’ in a more positive way: by saying ‘thank you’ instead of ‘I’m sorry’.

Read more >How to Flip-Think Your ‘Spoonie Guilt’ with These Two Words