How You Can Gradually Build Your Fitness with Cycling | The Health Sessions

How You Can Gradually Build Your Fitness with Cycling

This is a guest post by Sophie Elise from bestbikesforwomen.com.

 

Are you tired of being out of shape and want to gain your fitness back?

If your answer is yes, then you need to find a workout that fits your lifestyle. But there are thousands of workouts that can help you to achieve your goals. So, which one should you choose?

I would suggest cycling because it’s a fun and entertaining activity. If you are trying to improve your fitness level, then cycling is an ideal form of exercise for you. Because it will help to build your fitness gradually and the fact that it is an immensely enjoyable activity makes it more alluring. Furthermore, cycling also helps us to build our muscle and develop a toned body.

Below I am going to show you exactly how you can build your fitness gradually with bicycling.

Read more >How You Can Gradually Build Your Fitness with Cycling



The Ultimate Guide to Getting Things Done with Chronic Illness | The Health Sessions

The Ultimate Guide to Getting Things Done with Chronic Illness

“You never know how strong you are until being strong is your only choice.” – Bob Marley

I had big dreams for 2018. After focusing mostly on my family last year, now was the time to grow this website, write another book and work on some important personal goals. Life, however, had other plans.

The cold and flu season has hit our home hard this winter. It’s never fun having to take care of sick kids and spouses, especially not for weeks on end. But add a history of chronic illness, serious sleep deprivation and other important responsibilities to the mix, and you have the recipe for a body crash in the making.

These past two months reminded me again how much I (have to) rely on energy-conserving strategies to get things done no matter how good or bad I feel. After all, there are only so much tasks you can drop, delegate or defer.

I’ve written a lot over the years about ‘hacks’ that make life with chronic illness a little easier, from planning and pacing to ‘minimalism with a backup plan’, stress-free meal planning and sheet pan dinners.

But today I’d love to hear from you.

What is your best energy-saving life hack for getting things done with chronic illness? Which tricks do you use to do your job, run a household, raise a family, have a social life and/or pursue your passions despite of the pain, fatigue and symptoms you’re experiencing?

Help me make an ultimate guide of how to get things done with chronic illness by adding your tip(s) to the list!

Read more >The Ultimate Guide to Getting Things Done with Chronic Illness



12 Heartwarming Quotes to Encourage Compassion for Others and Yourself | The Health Sessions

12 Heartwarming Quotes to Encourage Compassion for Others and Yourself

Compassion is a admirable trait that forms the heart of our society, religions and humanistic views. Our minds and bodies seem to be wired to care. When you see somebody else suffer, your brain reacts to their pain as if it was your own. Not only do you instinctively empathize with others, the part of your brain that wants to alleviate their distress also lights up. Studies show that when you feel compassion, your heart rate slows down and the bonding hormone oxytocin is released.

Tuning into other people’s feelings in a kind manner doesn’t just help them – it makes you feel good too. Feeling compassion can improve your relationships, boost your resilience and give you a more optimistic outlook on life – all factors that are linked to a happier, healthier you.

And the good news is, you don’t have to become the next Mother Theresa or Gandhi to cultivate compassion. Simple things like looking for similarities between yourself and others or really listening to what someone’s saying also encourages feelings of compassion.

In the Dutch language, there’s an important distinction between ‘medelijden’ (compassion or pity; literal translation: co-suffering) and ‘medeleven’ (sympathy; literally: co-living). It’s a good thing when you genuinely want to understand what somebody’s going through and taking action to help them, but that doesn’t mean you should take on their suffering.

Because compassion is about being kind to yourself too. True self-compassion is not the same as a narcissistic self-love, being easy on yourself or making excuses. It’s about paying attention to your needs and taking a caring approach, instead of a self-critical one.

Have a look at these 12 heartwarming quotes to encourage compassion for others and yourself. 

Read more >12 Heartwarming Quotes to Encourage Compassion for Others and Yourself



Why Pacing Beats Push-and-Crash (and How to Best Manage Your Energy) | The Health Sessions

Why Pacing Beats Push-and-Crash Cycles (And How You Can Best Manage Your Energy)

If you’ve been living with a chronic illness for a while, you’ve probably heard of the Spoon Theory by Christine Miserandino. For someone who’s seriously sick, each day starts with a limited amount of “spoons” of energy. They carefully have to decided how you can best spend each one, knowing that even mondain tasks like taking a shower or making lunch costs you precious spoons.

The Spoon Theory is a helpful analogy of what it’s truly like to live with chronic illness or disability. But how does it work in reality? How do you decide how to spend your spoons? What do you do when you have no spoons left but still half a day ahead of you?

In my experience, there are two broad strategies: pacing and push-and-crash. 

I used to be the queen of push-and-crash cycles. At the time, it really was the only way to get things done: resting up and preparing before an event – going to school, necessary shopping trips, hanging out with family and friends – putting every last drop of effort into getting to and through the event and then… crash. Hard. It meant my symptoms would exacerbate and I couldn’t do much else but rest the next day(s) to recover from that activity.

Read more >Why Pacing Beats Push-and-Crash Cycles (And How You Can Best Manage Your Energy)



Sweet Seduction: 14 Healthy Chocolate Recipes | The Health Sessions

Sweet Seduction: 14 Healthy Chocolate Recipes

Chocolate is the ultimate guilty pleasure. From the Aztec times, the cocoa bean has had a feel-good, romance-inducing reputation. Besides being known for its aphrodisiac qualities, chocolate’s considered an indulgent but not-so-healthy treat. And while that certainly can be true for regular chocolate bars, science shows some chocolate is actually good for you.

In it’s purest form, raw cacao contains health-boosting antioxidants called flavonoids. These plant nutrients support a healthy heart, keep your blood sugar in check and fight inflammation in your body. Unprocessed cocoa powder is also rich in minerals like iron and magnesium, which help boost your energy.

But not all chocolate’s created equal: only dark chocolate with a 70% cocoa content or higher, and little milk and sugar added, counts as the real deal. And remember that chocolate is a stimulant, so it may not be helpful for those sensitive to caffeine.

If you want to really treat yourself and harness the power of raw cacao, look no further and try the healthy chocolate recipes below! 

Read more >Sweet Seduction: 14 Healthy Chocolate Recipes