7 Tips for Effective Communication with Your E-Doctor | The Health Sessions

7 Tips for Effective Communication with Your E-Doctor

This article is written in collaboration with Laboure College. 

Excellent communication is a fundamental part of any healthy relationship. Like any other healthy relationship, on a broad scale, it really applies to the doctor-patient relationship as well. When the main link of proper communication and understanding is broken between the doctor and patient relationship, a cascade of negative consequences can result. If the patient has not been able to express his or her symptoms, an incorrect diagnosis might be made. 

The Joint Commission on Accreditation of Healthcare Organizations states in their study “Medical Errors and Poor Communication,” that communication errors are the leading cause of 60% to 70% of preventable hospital deaths. If the doctor hasn’t clearly got the idea of what their patient has to say about their symptoms, they may end up prescribing a wrong treatment plan. Bad communication inevitably leads to disappointment for both patient and doctor.

When your doctor is well experienced, you tend to listen to what he has to say rather than explaining your symptoms. But the conversation goes both ways. If you feel like a proper communication isn’t happening between you and your doctor, you might want to consider your communication options – especially in your e-consultation, where you will only have a fixed amount of time. Whether it is a video call or chat service with your physician, open communication plays an essential part in your e-consultation.

Here are 7 tips to help you have a more effective communication with your e-doctor.

Read more >7 Tips for Effective Communication with Your E-Doctor



Actively Autoimmune: How Zoe Uses Exercise to Manage Multiple Chronic Conditions | The Health Sessions

Actively Autoimmune: How Zoe Uses Exercise to Manage Multiple Chronic Conditions

What’s it really like to live with chronic health problems every day? How do you deal with the physical symptoms, emotional turmoil and practical problems? In this interview series, real life ‘spoonies’ share their experiences and tips. Zoe is a 28-year old physiotherapist from England who lives with multiple chronic illnesses. On Actively Autoimmune, she shares … Read more >



Your 3-Step Guide to Stop Emotional Eating For Good | The Health Sessions

Are You an Emotional Eater? Here’s How to Stop.

This article is written by David Dack. 

Those chocolate chips may seem delicious when you’re feeling down.

But the relief won’t last. Devoid of the ability to process your emotions, you may become more inclined to turn toward food to find release for your feelings.

In other words, you’re emotionally eating, and it’s bad for you. If you’re dealing with emotional eating right now, I want to let you know that regardless of how challenging and impossible it may seem, you can break out of this seemingly vicious cycle.

Here are my top tips on how to stop emotional eating.

Read more >Are You an Emotional Eater? Here’s How to Stop.



6 Ways to Adjust to a New Normal | The Health Sessions

6 Ways to Adjust to a New Normal

This article is written by Liza Holst. 

It seems that right now everyone is adjusting to a new normal. Whether that be living with a chronic illness, experiencing anxiety due to the global pandemic we are in, or losing a loved one – it’s crucial to recognize these changes and adapt to them in a healthy way.

Here are 6 ways to make the most of any situation you’re going through right now and how to adapt in these trying times.

Read more >6 Ways to Adjust to a New Normal



Parenting with Chronic Illness: How Not to Overburden Your Kids | The Health Sessions

Parenting with Chronic Illness: How Not to Overburden Your Kids

All you want as a parent is for your kids to be happy and eventually become kind, responsible adults.

But then again, you also don’t want your children to have to grow up too soon. Unfortunately, being a parent with chronic illness can make your job a lot harder.

When mom or dad becomes sick and does not get better, the life of your entire family changes. Kids may have to learn how to do things independently more quickly than you would have liked to. What’s more, your son or daughter may worry about you or feel sad you can’t attend their concert or ball game.

Now there’s nothing wrong with doing chores around the house and learning taking care of each other. But as a parent who’s daily functioning is affected by chronic illness, you’ve probably found yourself worrying: What effect will my disease have on my kids? Am I putting too much weight on their small shoulders?

When a child takes on the job of looking after their parent(s) instead of the other way around, we call this parentification. There are two kinds of parentification:

  • Instrumental parentification: The kids take over many or all physical chores of the parent(s), including looking after siblings or paying the bills.
  • Emotional parentification: Children are asked to provide emotional support to a parent and listen to their (adult) problems.

This kind of role reversal disrupts the development of a secure attachment and has far-reaching effects on kids’ mental health. Parentified children may show signs of depression and anxiety, constant worrying and physical symptoms of chronic stress, like headaches and stomach pain. Even later in life, adults who were parentified as kids have an increased risk of mental health problems, substance abuse and getting involved in unhealthy relationships.

When you can’t shield your kids from the reality of living with (severe) chronic illness, what can you do to not overburden your kids? 

Every family, illness and situation is different, but here are some suggestions.

Read more >Parenting with Chronic Illness: How Not to Overburden Your Kids