A Fresh Take on Sleep Restlessness: How a Weighted Blanket Could Soothe Your Racing Mind | The Health Sessions

A Fresh Take on Sleep Restlessness: How a Weighted Blanket Could Soothe Your Racing Mind

This is an article by James M. Gregory.

50 – 70 million.

That would be the answer if the question were, “How many people in the US have a sleep disorder?”

That number might seem innocent on its own. So people don’t sleep well, no big deal, right? You might shrug it off if you don’t dig deeper and look at the ominous statistics about fatalities and injuries related to sleep deprivation (as reported by sleepassociation.org):

  • 1,550 fatal and 40,000 non-fatal injuries directly caused by drowsy driving alone
  • 100,000 fatal outcomes related to medical errors caused by sleep deprivation

 

An issue with the stats

There are gaping flaws in the statistical model we’re using today. Any sleep therapist with a modern approach could probably write an essay on all the things the stats can’t tell you.

The topic is beyond the scope of this article, but let us takes a moment to point out 3 obvious problems:

  • What constitutes a sleep disorder?
  • How many people are diagnosed vs. how many are suffering in silence or don’t even know they have a problem?
  • How many people involved in the sleep-related accidents or medical errors will be open about it?

You see a pattern here – most of the stats we have are subjective. To be honest, the issue of subjectivity is tricky and there isn’t much we can do about it. Furthermore, statistical models have a way of improving on their own as science moves forward and we tweak the models.

Read more >A Fresh Take on Sleep Restlessness: How a Weighted Blanket Could Soothe Your Racing Mind



How to Deal with the Uncontrollable Stress of Living with Chronic Illness | The Health Sessions

How to Deal with Uncontrollable Stress

The number one advice when you’re tense, frazzled and overwhelmed is to minimize your exposure to stress. But when life’s tragedies hit, that’s not an option.

Living with chronic illness comes with unavoidable stress. On top of unpredictable symptoms, pain and insomnia, you’re also faced with anxiety about the future, identity issues and new relationship dynamics. Even worse, you may have to deal with losing your job, financial problems or marital troubles. Not to mention the mountain of paperwork you have to sort through to keep track of medical records, insurances and social security benefits.

When stress can’t be prevented or escaped, there’s only one solution: finding effective ways to best deal with the uncontrollable stress.

Read more >How to Deal with Uncontrollable Stress



Using Essential Oils to Cope With Chronic Illness

This is a guest post by Trysh Sutton from Pure Path

The use of essential oils is an underrated, natural approach to dealing with the symptoms associated with many chronic illnesses. Individuals who go this route are usually able to save money on medication and reduce side effects that come with them.

But what are essential oils?

Essential oils are extremely concentrated, organic compounds that are in liquid form and sporting many of the benefits of certain plants without the need to have an unusual number of these plants physically available. As an example, it takes over 240,000 rose petals to create just 5ml of rose essential oil and almost 3,000 lemons to create 15ml of lemon essential oil.

Read more >Using Essential Oils to Cope With Chronic Illness



The Ultimate Guide to Getting Things Done with Chronic Illness | The Health Sessions

The Ultimate Guide to Getting Things Done with Chronic Illness

“You never know how strong you are until being strong is your only choice.” – Bob Marley

I had big dreams for 2018. After focusing mostly on my family last year, now was the time to grow this website, write another book and work on some important personal goals. Life, however, had other plans.

The cold and flu season has hit our home hard this winter. It’s never fun having to take care of sick kids and spouses, especially not for weeks on end. But add a history of chronic illness, serious sleep deprivation and other important responsibilities to the mix, and you have the recipe for a body crash in the making.

These past two months reminded me again how much I (have to) rely on energy-conserving strategies to get things done no matter how good or bad I feel. After all, there are only so much tasks you can drop, delegate or defer.

I’ve written a lot over the years about ‘hacks’ that make life with chronic illness a little easier, from planning and pacing to ‘minimalism with a backup plan’, stress-free meal planning and sheet pan dinners.

But today I’d love to hear from you.

What is your best energy-saving life hack for getting things done with chronic illness? Which tricks do you use to do your job, run a household, raise a family, have a social life and/or pursue your passions despite of the pain, fatigue and symptoms you’re experiencing?

Help me make an ultimate guide of how to get things done with chronic illness by adding your tip(s) to the list!

Read more >The Ultimate Guide to Getting Things Done with Chronic Illness



Why Pacing Beats Push-and-Crash (and How to Best Manage Your Energy) | The Health Sessions

Why Pacing Beats Push-and-Crash Cycles (And How You Can Best Manage Your Energy)

If you’ve been living with a chronic illness for a while, you’ve probably heard of the Spoon Theory by Christine Miserandino. For someone who’s seriously sick, each day starts with a limited amount of “spoons” of energy. They carefully have to decided how you can best spend each one, knowing that even mondain tasks like taking a shower or making lunch costs you precious spoons.

The Spoon Theory is a helpful analogy of what it’s truly like to live with chronic illness or disability. But how does it work in reality? How do you decide how to spend your spoons? What do you do when you have no spoons left but still half a day ahead of you?

In my experience, there are two broad strategies: pacing and push-and-crash. 

I used to be the queen of push-and-crash cycles. At the time, it really was the only way to get things done: resting up and preparing before an event – going to school, necessary shopping trips, hanging out with family and friends – putting every last drop of effort into getting to and through the event and then… crash. Hard. It meant my symptoms would exacerbate and I couldn’t do much else but rest the next day(s) to recover from that activity.

Read more >Why Pacing Beats Push-and-Crash Cycles (And How You Can Best Manage Your Energy)