How to Reset Your Internal Clock | The Health Sessions

10 Natural Ways to Reset Your Internal Clock

You know how you often feel tired and groggy in the afternoon? That’s your internal clock at work.

You might be more in tune with your work schedule than your body rhythm, but all of us are governed by a biological schedule. Circadian rhythm refers to the countless changes your body experiences over a 24-hour period. From your sleep-wake cycle to hormone production and daily fluctuations of alertness, circadian rhythms affect every aspect of your functioning.

The master internal clock that controls the different clocks throughout your body is a group of nerves in the hypothalamus called the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN). Each morning, light enters your eyes and travels along the optic nerve to signal to the SCN that it’s time to start the day’s circadian cycle.

For thousands of years, humans organized their days around their biological clock. But now that we are no longer getting up at sunrise, spending our days outdoors and going to bed when it gets dark, our body clocks get disrupted. And this can cause serious troubles. Research has linked disturbed internal clocks to anything from an increased chance at injuries and accidents to chronic health problems like obesity, heart disease and cognitive decline.

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11 Smart Food Combinations to Maximize Your Nutrient Absorption | The Health Sessions

11 Smart Food Combinations to Absorb More Nutrients

You know you should eat a wide variety of colorful foods to get all the vitamins and minerals you need to function well. But simply consuming these nutrients isn’t enough – your body has to absorb them first.

The percentage of vitamins, minerals and other micronutrients that makes it into your bloodstream after ingestion is called bioavailability. The bioavailability of nutrients is influenced by how you cook your food, your biological makeup and how you plan your menu.

Your menu? Yes. Because when you add certain ingredients together, that combination maximizes your body’s ability to absorb the available nutrients. Take a look at how you can get the most nutritional value out of your meals by making smart food combinations.

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9 Coffee Alternatives to Try If You're Cutting Back on Caffeine | The Health Sessions

9 Coffee Alternatives to Try If You’re Cutting Back on Caffeine

Does drinking (too much) coffee make you jittery, anxious or makes it harder to fall asleep? You’re not alone.

There’s a lot of conflicting evidence about coffee. Some research states that a moderate caffeine consumption may actually be good for you, while other studies found adverse side-effects of excess caffeine, like insomnia, anxiety and heart palpations.

One of the explanations for these mixed results may lie in your genes. Thanks to genetic variations, some people produce a less active version of the enzyme responsible for metabolizing caffeine than others. If that’s the case, caffeine will stay in your body and brain for a longer period of time. As a result, the physiological effects of caffeine will be more pronounced. That’s why slow-metabolizers experience are more sensitive to consuming caffeine than fast-metabolizers.

And of course, things like your liver health, use of oral contraceptives or being pregnant also play a role in caffeine sensitivity. 

Whatever your reasons for wanting to cut back on caffeine, you can still wake up to a warming, energizing drink. Try these 9 coffee alternatives to start your day off with a bang. 

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Functional Fitness: How to Train for Everyday Life | The Health Sessions

Functional Fitness: How to Train for Everyday Life

Most of us work out with a specific motivation in mind. Maybe you want to get back in shape, build more muscle or become a better runner. Improving your overall fitness is often just a nice byproduct. But what if training for real-life situations is your main reason for exercising?

Functional fitness is a term used for full-body workouts, during which you don’t train isolated muscle groups but move your body the way you use it in daily life. Instead of bench-pressing or jumping on the cross-trainer, you train your body to do everyday activities more easily and efficiently.

Functional fitness is also the word that best describes my view on exercising with chronic illness – namely focusing on those areas of fitness that improve your health and quality of life the most. Running on the treadmill obviously boosts your fitness, but it may not be the best choice if what you want most is to be able to carry your toddler or sit behind your desk without debilitating back pain.

You probably don’t live to exercise, but exercise to live a full life.

Read more >Functional Fitness: How to Train for Everyday Life



6 Exercises for Chronic Health Conditions | The Health Sessions

6 Exercises for Chronic Health Conditions

This article was written by Joshua from Detox Organics

Living with chronic health conditions comes with a lot of troubles, as you often feel pain while doing simple tasks that never have been an issue. No matter if you’re suffering from arthritis, COPD or Crohn’s disease, you’re always on the lookout for ways to get better. In the case of irritable bowel syndrome (IBS), people often try to figure out how to get rid of bloating, because that’s one of the main reasons for their discomfort.

One other remedy to the constant pain that’s hardly talked about is exercise. Sure, it can be challenging to exercise with chronic pain. You may feel easily exhausted and experience a lot of discomfort. On the other hand, inactivity can also weaken the muscles and joints over time, which is why it is encouraged to exercise often to regain strength and increase energy. 

Read more >6 Exercises for Chronic Health Conditions