10 Tips for Cooking with Arthritis | The Health Sessions

10 Tips for Cooking with Chronic Arthritis

This article is written by Christian Worstell. 

It’s widely recognized that your diet can have an effect on your arthritis, as certain foods tend to cause inflammation. But have you thought about how your arthritis can greatly affect which foods you eat?

The chronic pain, stiffness and lack of mobility brought on by arthritis is perhaps most worrisome when it limits your activity in the kitchen. Preparing healthy and nutritious meals can prove challenging to people suffering from arthritis, and the consequence can be malnutrition or an otherwise poor diet.

Being unable to chop up fresh fruits or vegetables can lead one to rely on pre-packaged and processed goods. The inability to open a can of soup can mean settling for some crackers or chips instead. Or worse, it may lead to skipping meals altogether.

But suffering from arthritis doesn’t have to mean sacrificing nutritious meals and healthy snacks. Here are 10 tips for maintaining healthy eating habits with arthritis.

Read more >10 Tips for Cooking with Chronic Arthritis



How to Enjoy Life to the Fullest Despite Chronic Pain | The Health Sessions

How to Enjoy Life to the Fullest Despite Chronic Pain

This article is written by Agatha Singer.

According to statistics, over 1.5 billion people on the planet suffer from chronic pain. Every single one of them knows that this affects every level of a person’s life. Depression, anxiety, and many other health issues are common problems that occur because of the chronic condition.

But you have the power to change your life for the better. Even if your pain cannot be cured, you can make your days lighter and ensure you are able to enjoy all kinds of fun activities. To achieve this, you’ll need to improve your general wellbeing, get new hobbies, and learn to seek help when you need it, among other things.

Read more >How to Enjoy Life to the Fullest Despite Chronic Pain



How Alternative Forms of Therapy Improved The Quality of My Life | The Health Sessions

How Alternative Forms of Therapy Improved the Quality of My Life

This article is written by Trevor McDonald. 

It was 8 a.m. on a Monday morning, and my alarm clock had been buzzing for nearly an hour. I was going to be late to work again. My pain kept me up until about 3 a.m. the previous night, and it was back with a vengeance. Time to pop another opioid painkiller. Could I remember a time when I wasn’t high?

Everything is a little fuzzy, and the pain persists. These pills aren’t working like they used to. I’d stop taking them altogether if only I could. But I can’t…

Not everyone who takes opioid painkillers gets addicted, but many people do. When your pain is chronic, and painkillers are the only reprieve, it’s difficult to avoid addiction.

Like every other fortunate addict, I eventually found my way out. But painkillers were no longer an option. I have scoliosis and suffer from chronic back pain from a bulging disc. Even after dragging myself back from the pits of addiction, I suffered. I wish I could convey how hard it was to go through recovery with chronic pain, but I know some of you know exactly what it’s like. I’m not the only one who has walked this path.

The pain was a constant trigger and it held me back from living a full life. One day, I decided to take control. It’s easy to feel hopeless in the face of adversity. But it’s important to remember that most problems have solutions.

Traditional methods failed me, but I found hope and happiness through alternative forms of therapy. I want to share the methods that worked for me, but I’m a firm believer that everyone is different. When it comes to alternative therapies, especially, there is no one-size-fits-all solution.

Here are some of the alternative therapies that worked well for me.

Read more >How Alternative Forms of Therapy Improved the Quality of My Life



7 Tips for Managing Your Arthritis Symptoms Naturally | The Health Sessions

7 Tips for Managing Your Arthritis Symptoms Naturally

This article is written by Carolyn Ridland from Caregiver Connection. 

Arthritis is a chronic health condition that affects millions of men and women in the United States. It occurs when one or more of the joints become inflamed and cause pain and other symptoms. The two most common types of arthritis are osteoarthritis (OA) and rheumatoid arthritis (RA).

If arthritis symptoms are not managed well, the condition can interfere with your quality of life and may even lead to reduced mobility. For these reasons, it is important to understand how arthritis affects the body and what you can do to protect your health.

Read more >7 Tips for Managing Your Arthritis Symptoms Naturally



More Than 'Just a Headache': What's It Like to Live with Migraine? | The Health Sessions

More Than ‘Just a Headache’: What It’s Really Like to Live with Chronic Migraine

What’s it really like to live with chronic health problems every day? How do you deal with the physical symptoms, emotional turmoil and practical problems? In this interview series, real life ‘spoonies’ share their experiences and tips.

Danielle Newport Fancher is a writer, migraine advocate and author of 10: A Memoir of Migraine Survival. She build a network for migraine sufferers called Migraine Writer. 

 

  1. Tell us a little about yourself.

My name is Danielle Newport Fancher. I’m a writer and migraine advocate. I’m sick of the stigma that a migraine is seen as “just a headache.” And, I am on a mission to change that perception.

  1. When did you first get sick?

I’ve been suffering from migraine since the age of 16. I’ve experienced chronic migraine for the past ten years. And on 10/2/2013, a migraine started that never stopped. In result. I’ve been battling constant pain ever since. This means that I haven’t had break (not even for a minute) in over five years.

  1. In what ways does having migraine affect your daily life?

Given that I am in constant pain, I am always catering to my migraine in every decision that I make. I don’t want to make a poor decision (like not drinking enough water or accidentally skipping a meal) to put me over the edge and trigger a new migraine.

Read more >More Than ‘Just a Headache’: What It’s Really Like to Live with Chronic Migraine