15 Tasty Ways to Eat More Leafy Greens (That Aren't Salads) | The Health Sessions

15 Tasty Ways to Eat More Leafy Greens (That Aren’t Salads)

There’s no denying it: eating leafy greens is vital to your health. Leafy greens are packed with vitamins, minerals and fiber, while being low in calories. Watercress, chard, beet greens and Romaine lettuce even top the list of ‘most nutrient-dense fruit and vegetables‘. Thanks to all these nutrients, leafy greens boost your immunity, support your bone health and digestion, and improve your inflammatory response. What’s more, chlorophyll, the green pigment that gives leafy greens their color, is also known to support your body natural detoxification process.

Salads and smoothies are the obvious – and popular- choice to get your greens in. But when it’s cold and dark outside, you might crave more warming foods. How can you still eat more leafy greens without resorting to a side salad and green smoothie?

Try these 15 tasty recipes to get your daily dose of leafy greens. 

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10 Surprising Ways to Eat Sea Vegetables | The Health Sessions

10 Surprising Ways to Eat Sea Vegetables (Besides Sushi)

Your momma probably told you to eat your greens, but did you know that sea vegetables are surprisingly good for you too?

Seaweeds grow along rocky shorelines and these algae pack pretty much all the minerals found in the ocean. Sea vegetables are especially known for their high iodine content, a nutrient necessary for thyroid functioning. They’re also rich in vitamin C, manganese, vitamin B2 and chlorophyll. The high level of antioxidants found in certain algae helps to reduce inflammation – an important cause of illness – in your body.

That sounds great, but how exactly do you add seaweeds like nori, dulse and kelp to your diet? Take a look at these 10 surprising ways to eat sea vegetables (that aren’t sushi). 

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Salads To-Go: 10 Portable Salads for a Healthy Work Lunch | The Health Sessions

Salads To-Go: 10 Portable Salads for a Healthy Work Lunch

It’s one of the first foods that comes to mind when you think of healthy eating: salads.

And for good reason. Leafy greens – the base of most salads – are low in calories but abundant in vitamins, minerals, fibers and disease-fighting antioxidants. Watercress, chard, spinach and Romaine lettuce all rank in the top 10 of the most nutrient-dense foods. What’s more, dark leafy greens like kale and collards contain chlorophyll, the green pigment found in plants that’s responsible for absorbing energy from sunlight. Chlorophyll is known for its blood-building properties, helps you liver detoxify and speeds up wound healing. Not bad for a humble plant, right?

But thankfully, the era of salads consisting mostly of iceberg lettuce with cucumber and tomato is long gone. Nowadays, we love power salads packed with (plant-based) protein, whole grains, a healthy dressing and crunchy toppings.

With the weather warming up, there’s no better time to swap your good old sandwich for a vibrantly fresh salad for lunch. Take a look at these 10 lunch salads to-go that will keep you full until dinner time. Which one will you bring to work – or the park!- with you?

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Shared Meals: 11 Family-Style Platters for Every Time of Day | The Health Sessions

Shared Meals: 11 Family-Style Platters for Every Time of Day

Have you been drooling over those pretty pictures of delicious food platters on Instagram and Pinterest?

There’s something ultimately relaxed about shared dining. I mean, what’s not to love about gathering around a beautiful board filled with foods for every flavour? That’s what makes shared meals perfect for festive occasions, from passing a vibrant crudité platter on parties to hosting a brunch.

If you have picky eaters, family-style meals also take the pressure off cooking something everyone will eat by serving separate components. When you put bowls with different foods on the table, everyone can create their own dinner.

Sharing a meal isn’t limited to snacks and dinnertime either. From breakfast boards to dessert platters, take a look at these 11 shared meals you can enjoy any time of day.

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11 Medicinal Mushroom Recipes That'll Boost Your Immunity | The Health Sessions

11 Medicinal Mushroom Recipes That’ll Boost Your Immunity

“All fungi are edible. Some fungi are only edible once.” – Terry Pratchett

For hundreds of years, mushrooms have been used in Traditional Chinese Medicine for healing purposes. Used in tinctures, powders and teas made from dried fungi, medicinal mushrooms were believed to support the immune system, protect heart health and promote longevity.

It turns out that these traditional healers were onto something. Not only are mushrooms packed with vitamin B and minerals like copper, selenium and zinc, they’re also an excellent source of antioxidants – substances that protect against cell damage from free radicals. That makes mushrooms great for fighting inflammation in the body and boosting your immunity.

What’s more, studies have found that medicinal mushrooms indeed contain powerful compounds that enhance your health. Although more research is needed, each mushroom seems to have their own unique benefits:

  • Shiitake support a healthy heart by lowering blood pressure and bad cholesterol in mice.
  • Reishi help your body adjust to physical and psychological stress, making it a natural remedy for anxiety, depression and sleeplessness.
  • Cordyceps are known for their energy-boosting powers. This mushroom fights fatigue and boosts athletic performance by enhancing cellular energy.
  • Chaga mushrooms are packed with antioxidants, helping you reduce disease-promoting inflammation in your body.
  • Maitake contain beta-glucans, which stimulate the immune system. In animal studies, maitake have been shown to reduce tumor growth and increase the number of cells fighting tumors.

Of course the most pleasurable way to get the benefits from these medicinal mushrooms is to add them to your diet. Because of their meaty texture and earthy flavors, mushrooms lend themselves really well for vegetarian dishes.

If you do want to take supplements, powders or tinctures, please check with your doctor for the right dosage, unwanted side effects and possible drug interactions. It’s also best not to eat mushrooms raw – and don’t forage them in the wild without expertise.

Include some medicinal mushroom magic in your meals with these 11 fungi recipes. 

Read more >11 Medicinal Mushroom Recipes That’ll Boost Your Immunity